Report: Virtual public cloud falls short on price and performance needs

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Gigaom

There’s no question that virtualized public clouds have revolutionized the technology landscape, giving cloud-savvy companies the leverage to scale at the speed of business while minimizing up-front operating expenses, reducing complexity and only paying for the capacity they need.

However, for certain types of applications, virtualized public clouds can present significant performance limitations due to the multi-tenant environment and processing overhead of the hypervisor layer, especially as traffic levels scale. This is particularly significant for the emerging generation of fast, big data applications, such as those that enable personalization and targeting through customer insights, social analytics and transactional analysis.

These applications require public cloud infrastructure that can guarantee consistently high speed and ultra-low latency to enable massive amounts of uninterrupted data ingestion and real-time analysis, as well as cost-efficiency at scale.

Amid these new pressures on traditional public cloud services, Internap surveyed nearly 250 internet infrastructure decision-makers to gain insight…

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T-Mobile exempts music streaming from its data plans, partners with Rhapsody

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Gigaom

There is a bit more to Uncarrier 5.0 than the new Test Drive iPhone loaner program T-Mobile(s tmus) announced earlier this evening. CEO John Legere said that T-Mobile is allowing unlimited music streaming on its Simple Choice data plans — regardless of whether you subscribe to an all-you-can-eat plan or one with a monthly data bucket.

T-Mobile is basically giving audio streaming services like Pandora(s p), iTunes Radio(s aapl) and Spotify a free pass on its network as long as you to subscribe to a $50 or higher plan (it’s not available on Simple Starter plans). Any data used won’t count against your monthly allotment. That’s good news if you subscribe to one of T-Mobile’s 1GB, 3GB or 5GB plans, but not that noteworthy if you pay  the $80-a-month plan, which already supports unlimited data of any sort.

Source: Kevin Fitchard / Gigaom John Legere at T-Mobile’s Uncarrier 5.0 launch event (Source: Kevin Fitchard…

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Nimboxx unveils its data center appliance and snags $12 million in funding

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Gigaom

Nimboxx, a Gigaom Structure 2014 Launchpad People’s Choice winner, plans to announce its kernel-based virtual machine (KVM) data-center-in-a-box Thursday at Structure. Additionally, the company will also reveal that it has landed $12 million in Series A funding from Hong Kong-based SMC Holdings.

The company’s appliance is geared toward small-to-medium-sized businesses that don’t necessarily have the IT staff or the expertise to deal with the complexities of managing multiple virtual machines.

Trent Fitz, Nimboxx’s chief marketing officer, told Gigaom in May that a user of the company’s appliance will be able to spin up multiple virtual machines in around seven minutes after setting up the hardware.

The company currently competes with other data-center-in-a-box companies like Nutanix and Simplivity.

Nimboxx has 26 employees and expects to double that by the end of this year.

Structure 2014 ticker

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Twitter buys SnappyTV, the startup that’s made many of its video cards

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Gigaom

Twitter (S TWTR) has acquired San Francisco-based video sharing startup SnappyTV, both companies announced Thursday without spilling any beans about the financials of the deal. You may have never heard of SnappyTV, but chances are, you’ve seen some of its work on Twitter before: SnappyTV has helped Turner to share March Madness clips in near-realtime, and also powered the video cards of numerous other TV networks. With the acquisition, Twitter obviously wants to bolster its own media chops, but the company promised Thursday that SnappyTV customers will continue to be able to share media on Facebook (S FB) and elsewhere as well.

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Gigaom Research webinar: the future of software-defined storage

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Gigaom

Software-defined storage (SDS) is still evolving. Conceptually, SDS abstracts and moves the traditional storage controller core engine and adjacent management functions from the storage array to  software — just about anywhere in the storage infrastructure. SDS, from a Microsoft perspective, is about bringing public cloud scale storage and cost economics to private clouds and enterprises.

Why separate and abstract the storage-controller functions? Key advantages include simplification, cost efficiencies via utilization of industry standard hardware, efficiency and flexibility though automation and resource pooling, and maximizing scale, availability and performance at low price points.

In this webinar, our panel will discuss these topics:

  • What are the ideal use cases for SDS, and how should IT prioritize them?
  • What key features should businesses look for in an SDS solution?
  • How important is choosing a long-term strategic partner for your SDS journey?
  • What are current trends in storage, such as the decoupling of storage…

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The New York Times, WaPo and Mozilla are building an open-source community platform to try and fix comments

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Gigaom

Media companies both large and small may differ on many things — the value of print, the efficacy of paywalls, and so on — but one thing they almost all agree on is that reader comments are a wasteland of trolls and flame wars. There have been attempts to fix that problem in a number of ways, but many have simply given up trying and handed their comments over to Facebook. Now, a joint venture between the New York Times, the Washington Post and the Knight-Mozilla OpenNews project is going to try and come up with an alternative.

The new venture isn’t just about comments either: as Dan Sinker, who runs the Knight-Mozilla OpenNews project, described in a blog post announcing the collaboration, it is intended to be a platform that allows media companies to connect with their readers on a number of different levels — including by…

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US Marshals’ leak of possible bitcoin bidders suggests existing investors may double down at auction

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Gigaom

An administrative blunder by the U.S. Marshals service has revealed the names of more than a dozen people who expressed interest in an unusual upcoming auction for about 30,000 bitcoins seized last year from the illegal online drug marketplace Silk Road.

As Coin Desk reports, the names were leaked when the Marshals service sent a bulk reply about the auction process, but “cc’d” rather than “bcc’d” the recipients — revealing some familiar names in the process.

These include Fred Ehrsam of Coinbase and Barry Silbert of Second Market, both of whom head prominent bitcoin companies and are believed to own large quantities of the virtual currency themselves.

The list also includes other individuals tied to existing bitcoin businesses and, interestingly, names from the investment banking world. These include a person who works in quantitative arbitrage at BNP Paribas, as well as someone from hedge fund manager Matrix Capital Management. A Yelp…

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